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03-Dec-2017 17:08

And just for the record, we won’t be locking you out of the site if you decide to not support us by removing ads.We may show a little message asking you not to do it, but we will never lock you out. Feel free to vent your frustrations in the comments.Over the past few months, I’ve been contacted by a good number of readers who have had problems downloading our guides, or why they can’t see the login buttons or comments not loading; and in 99% of cases, it’s because they’re running one these plugins – Ad Block, No Script, or Ghostery – which I shall hereby refer to as the “trifecta of evil”. Matt has already written an extensive article on why Ad Block plugin is destroying the Internet, but I want to throw my own opinion in here too.For those of you who don’t know, Ad Block silently removes all advertising and social buttons.Apologies if you think my definition of free is defective, but you’re arguing over semantics and kind of missing the point.What makes me angry about the Ad Block plugin is that the author – while happy to destroy our revenue stream – is also profiteering from the very same free content model by asking for Pay Pal donations when the plugin is installed. I understand that some adverts can be annoying – and we do try to remove any that auto-play a video or make noise on page load as soon as we identify them (contrary to popular belief, site owners do not choose the ads that get displayed, but we can kill them off if we find inappropriate or annoying ones, and we have requested that no such video ads be displayed as a general rule) – but the free content model is entirely what keeps the online world afloat.But the Internet has very much moved on and evolved from those early days. Moreover, Javascript is an integral component of modern HTML5 standards, and j Query – the most popular Javascript framework – has pushed forward web interfaces far, far beyond pages full of images, links and tables. So when you use No Script, you’re breaking the Internet.Not only do you drag webpages 10 years into the past, but you prevent essential modern page components from loading – hit counters and such – which again, hurts our bottom line by not giving us an accurate picture of who visits our page; as well as obviously blocking ads.

On the one hand, I think it’s important that users are educated about what’s going on behind the scenes on a site.I’ll admit right now that when you throw social networks into the mix, we may have serious privacy concerns – because suddenly, all this data can be traced back to you and not simply an anonymous user.I’ll leave that to another time or another author to present that side of the argument though.So even if a tracking script does follow some of your browsing habits, is it such a big deal?At the very worst end of the scale (that is, not the ones that simply act like hit counters), they’re being used for what’s called a .

On the one hand, I think it’s important that users are educated about what’s going on behind the scenes on a site.

I’ll admit right now that when you throw social networks into the mix, we may have serious privacy concerns – because suddenly, all this data can be traced back to you and not simply an anonymous user.

I’ll leave that to another time or another author to present that side of the argument though.

So even if a tracking script does follow some of your browsing habits, is it such a big deal?

At the very worst end of the scale (that is, not the ones that simply act like hit counters), they’re being used for what’s called a .

So how much can these companies actually “track” your web usage?